Common Airbags And Seat Belts Problems

  1. TRW Crash Sensor Defect

    There's growing concern that some sort of electrical overstress is messing with airbag control units (ACU) in certain Acura vehicles. And that's a problem since it's the sensor that senses when a crash occurs and tells the airbags to deploy…

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  2. Takata Airbag Inflator Recall

    A large number of Acura vehicles have been recalled because they contain dangerous airbag inflators made by Takata. The shrapnel-hurling inflators have been recalled in over 37 million vehicles (and counting).

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Where Airbags And Seat Belts Complaints Happen

Sometimes it helps just to tally up the complaints and see where the biggest stacks are. Use this information to learn about troublespots or to run for the hills.

Recent Airbags And Seat Belts News

There's a lot of news out there, but not all of it matters. We try to boil down it to the most important bits about things that actually help you with your car problem. Interested in getting these stories in an email? Signup for free email alerts over at CarComplaints.com.

  1. Over 2.4 million Honda and Acura vehicles are being recalled to replace the Takata non-azide driver-side inflators (NADI) found in certain 1997–2003 models.

    NADI inflators are similar, but somehow even more dangerous to previously recalled Takata products. Both may explode on deployment due to excess moisture build-up, but non-azide inflators can also fail to fully inflate the airbags in a crash.

    It’s a worst-of-both worlds situation and you’ll want to get them out of your vehicle as soon as possible. According to the recall that’ll be sometime in March of 2020.

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  2. A Honda Takata airbag recall for about 1.6 million Acura and Honda vehicles in the U.S. has been announced six months ahead of a schedule set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

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  3. When Honda and Acura recalled 1.1 million Takata airbag inflators for exploding into pieces, they replaced the defective part with a slightly different version from the same company. Now those are exploding too.

    The replacement PSDI-5D desiccated inflators were exposed to excess moisture during assembly. This rapidly degrades the propellant and allows pressure to build up over time, turning the inflator into a mini-grenade that explodes during airbag deployment.

    Acura plans on mailing recall notifications on April 17th, but parts are already available and affected owners should schedule a replacement as soon as possible. Unlike the dishes, this is one chore you shouldn’t ignore.

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  4. A Puerto Rico man has sued Honda after being severely injured by an exploding Takata airbag.

    According to the lawsuit, the plaintiff's Acura "lightly bumped" another car in front but the Takata frontal airbag allegedly exploded and sent shrapnel into his face, chest and neck, allegedly causing severe lacerations.

    The 2002 TL is on the “high risk” list which has Honda representatives going door-to-door in some areas urging owners to get the necessary repairs. but it’s possible they weren’t doing this in Puerto Rico.

    In this case, the plaintiff said he received five recall notices one month after the accident.

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  5. When a storm cloud starts dropping rain, you can only dodge the drops for so long.

    Such is the case for another 2.2 million Honda and Acura vehicles that are now involved in one of the largest and most dangerous recalls in automotive history.

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  6. I'll admit it, the first time I see frost on my windshield I get a bit cranky. But it's nothing compared to the tantrum some Acura seat belts are throwing.

    They simply refuse to move when the temperature gets frosty. They are freezing in place and prompting a safety recall.

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